Author Topic: Monitoring the Ukraine Using WebSDRs  (Read 1614 times)

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Offline W1RC

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Monitoring the Ukraine Using WebSDRs
« on: March 04, 2022, 05:45:42 AM »
Web-based Software Defined Radios (SDR) have exploded in popularity in recent years. SDRs located in Ukraine give you the ability to monitor the airwaves from the middle of potential military action. As of this writing, there are still WebSDRs active within Ukraine. However, there have been warnings about what running a SDR available to the Internet could mean for Ukrainian citizens.

Stanislav Stetsenko was a resident of Crimea and regularly monitored ADS-B traffic. Stan was arrested by Russian Federal Security Services and is currently in prison in Moscow, Russia on charges he is a Ukrainian spy. That incident led to the RTL-SDR enthusiast blog to issue a warning to current Ukrainian SDR enthusiasts.

* Online WebSDRs via KiwiSDR               http://rx.linkfanel.net/
* WebSDR (filter to European region)      http://websdr.org/

Russian Military Shortwave Frequencies (Updated 3/1/2022)
Intelligence has been floating around social media listing potential Russian frequencies being used by forces in Ukraine. There has been numerous audio recordings captured from these frequencies that are entirely in the clear (no encryption). If you?ve had success hearing activity on any of the following drop a comment below and let me know what you?ve heard.
* 5125 KHz USB
* 5130 KHz USB
* 4615 KHz USB
* 7580 KHz USB
* 7811 KHz USB
* 8033 KHz USB
* 8131 KHz USB (Russian Air Force)
* 4220 KHz USB
* 4625 KHz USB
Russian Bomber VHF Frequencies
These are likely to be AM (amplitude modulation), but might be worth checking FM as well.
* 124.000 MHz
* 128.500 MHz
* 136.250 MHz
* 138.550 MHz
* 284.650 MHz
* 289.000 MHz
* 358.125 MHz
HF communications are still a crucial part of military communications. Here are some frequencies worth monitoring as tensions rise in Ukraine. The frequencies below separated by district provide coded messages and are thought to be run by the Russian military. You?ll likely hear jamming by citizens across the world as a form of radio frequency protest. Data provided by Pyriom.

Western Military District
* The Buzzer (4625 kHz)
* D marker (5292 kHz)
* T marker (4182 kHz)
* The Air Horn (3510 kHz)
* The Goose (4310/3243 kHz)
* The Alarm (4770 kHz)
* Katok-65 (4224/3218.5 kHz)

Southern Military District
* The Pip (5448/3756 kHz)
* The Squeaky Wheel (5473/3828 kHz)
* Vega (5372 kHz)
* Baron-78 (3850/4940 kHz)

Russian Air Force Frequencies
* All voice frequencies mentioned on this page are on the upper sideband.
* The aircraft callsigns are made of 5 digits.
* The primary/secondary designations reflect the usage by aircraft; the ground stations usually transmit on all frequencies simultaneously.

Military Transport Aviation
Frequencies (kHz)
* 6685
* 8847 (secondary)
* 11360
* 18030
Ground station callsigns
* Davlenie: 708th Regiment, Taganrog
* Kasta: 224th Detachment, Tver
* Klarnetist: 196th Regiment, Tver
* Korsar: Military Transport Aviation HQ, Moscow
* Magnetron: 566th Regiment, Seshcha
* Lad?ya: Heard in radio checks, location unconfirmed
* Polis: 117th Regiment, Orenburg
* Polotno: Heard in radio checks, location unconfirmed
* Proselok: 334th Regiment, Pskov
This network carries plain voice traffic between transport aircraft and the Military Transport Aviation units.

Voice Frequencies (USB):  5827, 5833, 5803, 5617, 5827, 8131, 8090,
                                                    8909, 8033, 8131, 11223, 11320

Call signs
?Balans? (Moscow)
?Katolik? (Saratov)
?Dvojchatka? (Moscow-2)
?Limit? (Saratov-2)
?Nabor? (Moscow)
?Shpora? (Saratov)
?Balans? (Moscow-2)
?Tezis? (Saratov-2)
?Ochistka? (Moscow)
?Medyanka? (Saratov)
?Duga? (Saratov-2)
?Stupen? (Moscow)
?Tablica? (Saratov)
?Kedr? (Saratov-2)
?Balans? (Moscow)
?Katolik? (Saratov)
?Dvojchatka? (Moscow-2)
?Limit? (Saratov-2)

Training operations are conducted away from the main frequencies. Voice communications take place within the 5.6 MHz range, with a single ground station present using a distinct callsign. Otherwise, the procedures used are exactly the same. The voiced callsigns for the ground stations when conducting training are named above as Moscow-2 and Saratov-2.

Training operations are conducted away from the main frequencies. Voice communications take place within the 5.6 MHz range, with a single ground station present using a distinct callsign. Otherwise, the procedures used are exactly the same. The voiced callsigns for the ground stations when conducting training are named above as Moscow-2 and Saratov-2.

REA4
REA4 is a Morse code station of the Long-Range Aviation that broadcasts airfield weather reports and ?Monolith? messages.

Thanks to K0LWC.....

Offline W1RC

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Re: Monitoring the Ukraine Using WebSDRs
« Reply #1 on: March 13, 2022, 11:26:06 AM »
More......RUSSIAN MILITARY
As the action unfolds many frequencies have been monitored with Russian traffic. Most of the communications are in Russian.

Frequencies received through many European SDRs:

4380 USB
4621 LSB
4649.5 USB
5349 USB
7580 USB
7811 USB
8131 USB

Second set of frequencies heard on some SDRs

3920 USB calling Russians outside conflict area?
4380 U basis Air Mil Kaliningrad ATC
4397 U
4421 U Ru Mil Air Dir.
4610 U
4649,5 U main active channel
5125 U channels in the 60mb band are disrupted by the Ukrainian resistance movement
5130 U The Polish channel TVN24 reported that the Ukrainian Ministry of Defense controls Russian radio
traffic.
5320 U
5330 U
5342 U
5837 U


OTHER RUSSIAN MILITARY FREQUENCIES
Military Transport Aviation Frequencies
6685
8847 (Secondary)
11360
18030
Ground station callsigns
Davlenie: 708th Regiment, Taganrog
Kasta: 224th Detachment, Tver
Klarnetist: 196th Regiment, Tver
Korsar: Military Transport Aviation HQ, Moscow
Magnetron: 566th Regiment, Seshcha
Lad'ya: Heard in radio checks, location unconfirmed
Polis: 117th Regiment, Orenburg
Polotno: Heard in radio checks, location unconfirmed
Proselok: 334th Regiment, Pskov

Long-Range Aviation [table difficult to copy]

THE PIP
The Pip (a nickname given by radio listeners) is a shortwave radio station that broadcasts on the frequency 5448 kHz by day, and 3756 kHz during the night.[1][2] It broadcasts short, repeated beeps at a rate of around 50 per minute, for 24 hours per day. The beep signal is occasionally interrupted by voice messages in Russian. The Pip has been active since around 1985, when its distinctive beeping sound was first recorded by listeners, and is a sister station to UVB-76.  The station is commonly referred to as "The Pip" among English-speaking radio listeners. In Russia, it is known as Капля (Kaplya) "the drop". While its official name or callsign is not known, some of the voice transmissions begin with the code JVB1 which is generally considered to be the name of the station.

However, this code may not be a callsign, but instead serve some other purpose.[2] Radioscanner.ru identifies the owner of this station as a North-Caucasian military district communication center with callsign "Akacia" (ex-72nd communication center, Russian "72 узел связи штаба СКВО").

SQUEAKY WHEEL
The Squeaky Wheel (a nickname given by radio listeners) is a utility shortwave radio station that broadcasts a distinctive sound. From around 2000 until 2008 the station's attention tone was a high-pitched two-tone signal that vaguely resembled a squeaky wheel. From 2008 the channel marker changed to two different tones in a short sequence repeated with a short silent gap. The frequencies were 5473 kHz (day) and 3828 kHz (night). Several times voice messages in the format of Strategic Flash Messages have been reported.

The exact transmitter site is unknown but is thought to be near Rostov-on-Don, Russia. The signal strength is not very good in Central Europe and the signal sometimes even disappears for days in the noise.

Other frequencies observed are 3650 kHz, 3815 kHz, 5474 kHz, and 5641 kHz.

The Enigma designation is S32 with S indicating Slavic language. However, from 2000 to 2005 it was designated XSW when voice on the station was unknown.

USE KIWI SDRs ONLINE TO LISTEN
Although it is possible to hear some of these communications in North America, Listening in from a online receiver close to the area affected will help in getting reception of any of the stations and signals we talked about in this column.

Use the Map view and click on stations in Europe and close to the area you want to listen to.

See you next month!


73
Gilles

Credit: THE WORLD OF UTILITIES
Editor: Gilles Letourneau, VE2ZZI
Montreal, Quebec